Twilight Zone: The Invisible Man Comic

This project explores an adaptation in the form of a comic, using the story of “The Invisible Man.”

PDF Version

For this project, I had to create an adaptation for H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man.” As a “Twilight Zone” enthusiast, I was immediately inspired by the 60’s sci-fi television series. H.G. Wells’ original text also falls under the sci-fi genre, so the choice to create a double adaptation was reasonably possible.

The project guidelines are to create an adaptation with the chosen story, and create a new spin. This can be done any number of ways, including changing the genre, such as drama or comedy, changing the form, such as comic or short story, changing the plot, such as incorporating new twists. The story can be appropriated, salvaged, or completely torn down and rebuilt.

Last semester at Drake University, I took a course called “Reading and Writing Comics,” and the class gave me the necessary resources to create such a project. I decided to change the way I created the “Invisible Man” comic from all my previous comics works. I created the comics completely by hand last semester, and to speed up the process for this project, I used Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and Indesign. This was my first time using these applications for a digital comic.

There was certainly a learning curve involved in the process of creating this comic. I am not too familiar with Illustrator or Indesign, although I did have some basic knowledge about the programs prior to the start of this project. Photoshop is the most familiar to me, because that is the program I use to create all of my digital paintings. The panels were created in Indesign, the characters in Illustrator, and the backgrounds and texts in Photoshop. It was really fun to integrate the three programs at the same time, and be able to seamlessly switch from one program to the next.

The major thing I changed in my adaptation of “The Invisible Man” was the circumstance for which Griffin, the main character, becomes invisible. Instead of having him test his experiment on himself, I had him become the unwilling victim of scientific experimentation. Since I only made this piece 6 pages, I had to severely condense the story. I cut out some major plot points and characters, but I tried my best to be mindful about doing so. The things I cut out, I made sure to add a wink somewhere within the comic. Perhaps my favorite example of this wink is Griffin getting bitten by a dog. I cut that out, and instead replaced the whole scene with a TV set playing Sound of Music, specifically the scene of “My Favorite Things,” and the lyrics ‘When the dog bites!’

I had a lot of fun working on and creating this project.

To view each image larger and in more detail, click on the desired thumbnail.

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